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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/43
Title: The impact of pain on spiritual well-being in people with a spinal cord injury
Authors: Siddall, PJ
McIndoe, L
Austin, P
Wrigley, PJ
ANZCA/FPM Author: Siddall, PJ
Wrigley, PJ
Keywords: spinal cord
depression
spirituality
spinal cord injury
Issue Date: Jan-2017
Citation: Siddall PJ, McIndoe L, Austin P, Wrigley PJ. The impact of pain on spiritual well-being in people with a spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 2017;55:105-11.
Abstract: STUDY DESIGN: The study uses a cross-sectional, group comparison, questionnaire-based design. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether spinal cord injury and pain have an impact on spiritual well-being and whether there is an association between spiritual well-being and measures of pain and psychological function. SETTING: University teaching hospital in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. METHODS: Questionnaires evaluating pain, psychological and spiritual well-being were administered to a group of people with a spinal cord injury (n=53) and a group without spinal cord injury (n=37). Spiritual well-being was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness and Therapy - Spirituality Extended Scale (FACIT-Sp-Ex). Pain and psychological function were also assessed using standard, validated measures of pain intensity, pain interference, mood and cognition. RESULTS: Levels of spiritual well-being in people with a spinal cord injury were significantly lower when compared with people without a spinal cord injury. In addition, there was a moderate but significant negative correlation between spiritual well-being and pain intensity. There was also a strong and significant negative correlation between depression and spiritual well-being and a strong and significant positive correlation between spiritual well-being and both pain self-efficacy and satisfaction with life. CONCLUSION: Consequences of a spinal cord injury include increased levels of spiritual distress, which is associated, with higher levels of pain and depression and lower levels of pain self-efficacy and satisfaction with life. These findings indicate the importance of addressing spiritual well-being as an important component in the long-term rehabilitation of any person following spinal cord injury. SPONSORSHIP: This study was supported by grant funding from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.
Description: Acknowledgement: Study was supported from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/43
DOI: 10.1038/sc.2016.75
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=The+impact+of+pain+on+spiritual+well-being+in+people+with+a+spinal+cord+injury
ISSN: 1362-4393
Journal Title: Spinal Cord
Type: Journal Article
Affiliates: Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists
Study/Trial: Survey
Appears in Collections:Scholarly and Clinical

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