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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/655
Title: Neuroprotective Effects Against POCD by Photobiomodulation: Evidence from Assembly/Disassembly of the Cytoskeleton.
Authors: Liebert, AD
Chow, RT
Bicknell, BT
Varigos, E
ANZCA/FPM Author: Varigos, E
Keywords: PBM
POCD
cytoskeleton
neuroprotection
photobiomodulation
postoperative cognitive dysfunction
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: 10:1-19
Abstract: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a decline in memory following anaesthesia and surgery in elderly patients. While often reversible, it consumes medical resources, compromises patient well-being, and possibly accelerates progression into Alzheimer's disease. Anesthetics have been implicated in POCD, as has neuroinflammation, as indicated by cytokine inflammatory markers. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is an effective treatment for a number of conditions, including inflammation. PBM also has a direct effect on microtubule disassembly in neurons with the formation of small, reversible varicosities, which cause neural blockade and alleviation of pain symptoms. This mimics endogenously formed varicosities that are neuroprotective against damage, toxins, and the formation of larger, destructive varicosities and focal swellings. It is proposed that PBM may be effective as a preconditioning treatment against POCD; similar to the PBM treatment, protective and abscopal effects that have been demonstrated in experimental models of macular degeneration, neurological, and cardiac conditions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/655
DOI: 10.4137/JEN.S33444
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26848276
ISSN: 1179-0695
Journal Title: Journal of Experimental Neuroscience
Type: Journal Article
Affiliates: University of Sydney
Brain and Mind Institute
Australian Catholic University
Olympic Park Clinic
Study/Trial: Case Control Studies
Appears in Collections:Scholarly and Clinical

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