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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/697
Title: Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.
Authors: Eley, V A
Callaway, L
van Zundert, A A
ANZCA/FPM Author: Eley, VA
Van Zundert, AM
Issue Date: Jul-2015
Citation: Anaesthesia and intensive care 2015-07; 43 Suppl: 12-21
Abstract: Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/697
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26126071
ISSN: 0310-057X
Journal Title: Anaesthesia and intensive care
Type: Historical Article
Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Scholarly and Clinical

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